My favorite hamentashen recipe!

This is the dough recipe I make most often. 



2 cups flour

1 cup sugar

1 stick butter

1/2 tsp baking powder

1/4 tsp salt

1 egg

1 1/2 tsp vanilla extract

Cream the butter and sugar well. Add the egg and vanilla extract and mix well.

Combine flour with baking powder and salt. Stir in to the butter and sugar mixture carefully, or you will get flour everywhere. Stir till butter mixture is. just combined. 

Press dough into a chubby log about 3 inches high. Wrap in parchment ot wax paper and refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Meanwhile, make a chocolate ganache:

4 oz unsweetened chocolate, chopped

1/2 cup butter

3/4 cup sugar

1/4  tsp salt

1 tsp vanilla

2 eggs, cold

2 TB flour

Melt chocolate and butter in a small saucepan over simmering water, stirring occasionally. Remove from heat. Add sugar and vanilla extract and mix well. Add eggs, one at a time, stirring well after each addition. Then add flour all at once, and stir till mixture becomes glossy and pulls away from the sides of the pan.  Cool in refrigerator.

To make cookies, on wax paper or a floured surface, slice chubby roll of dough 1/8″ thick, roll between two sheets of wax paper to even out, and cut with cookie cutter to even 3″ circle.  If you are lucky, you dont have to do the additional roll and cut but even with it, This is still faster than the usual  method of rolling and cutting.





For chocolate stripes and marbling, work some ganache into some dough. Its messy and sticky but fast.



Then cut your log into thick vertical slices and work your sticky chocolate dough between the slices, and reassemble the log and chill that awhile.



You don’t need much chocolate dough to make stripes. See?

Fill cookies by using two DEMITASSE  spoon to put ganache on dough circles. Fold corners under each other or pinch well. Place filled cookies 2″ apart on parchment papet lined pans and bake 12-15 minutes at 350 degrees.

Cool briefly on parchment then transfer to racks to cool completely.





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Gluten-Free Recipe!

There were some delicious gluten-free hamentashen we made, thanks to Aimee Lysaght. This was the recipe she used, and judging from the amount of dough we had to work with, she doubled or tripled it:

2 cups gluten-free flour–Aimee used “Cup For Cup” all -purpose gluten-free flour

2 teaspoons double-acting baking powder

¼ teaspoon salt

¾ cups granulated sugar

1 stick butter (1/4 pound), cold

1 orange, grated

3 teaspoons fresh orange juice

In the bowl of a stand-up mixer, stir together the flour, baking powder, salt and sugar.

Cut the butter into ½ inches slices and with the mixer on low, cut the butter into the dry ingredients until the particles are fine and the mixture resembles coarse meal. Add the grated orange and orange juice into the dough. Mix thoroughly and then stir well until the dough is completely moistened and smooth.

Shape into two discs and wrap in wax paper or parchment. Refrigerate overnight…or longer, if you wish.

When you are ready to bake, adjust two racks to divide the oven into thirds. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cover cookie sheets with parchment.

Work with half of the pastry dough at a time refrigerating the other half. It is important to work with dough that is cold. Work quickly or the dough will become sticky.

On a floured pastry cloth or Silpat non-stick baking mat, with a floured rolling pin, roll out the dough, turning it over occasionally to keep both sides floured. Roll it to an even 1/8-inch thickness. With plain round 3-inch cookie cutter (I use a glass), cut the dough into rounds. Reserve the scraps of dough, press them together, and rechill until firm enough to roll.

Hold one round in your hand. Place rounded teaspoonful of your desired filling in the center. Fold up two sides of the dough-each side being a third of the circle and pinch them together where they meet. Now fold the third side and pinch together at both sides, forming a triangle and leaving a generous opening at the top.

Place hamantashen about 2 inches apart on the baking sheet. Bake 12-15 minutes (depending on your oven) until the cookies are barely colored on all sides. Transfer to a rack to cool.

Each recipes yields about 30 hamantashen.

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Recipes!

March 1 at Etz Chayim was a big day for Purim. Donna Munic and I made batches of dough for Hamentashen, and many hands rolled, cut, filled and shaped for 2 hours.

This was the recipe Donna used:

 

2 cups all purpose flour

2 teaspoons double-acting baking powder

¼ teaspoon salt

¾ cups granulated sugar

1 stick butter (1/4 pound), cold

1 orange, grated

3 teaspoons fresh orange juice 1 egg 

In the bowl of a stand-up mixer, stir together the flour, baking powder, salt and sugar.

 

Cut the butter into ½ inches slices and with the mixer on low, cut the butter into the dry ingredients until the particles are fine and the mixture resembles coarse meal.

 

Beat the egg lightly just to mix. Add the egg, orange rind and orange juice into the dough. Mix thoroughly and then stir well until the dough is completely moistened and smooth.

 

Shape into two discs and wrap in wax paper or parchment. Refrigerate overnight…or longer, if you wish.

 

When you are ready to bake, adjust two racks to divide the oven into thirds. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Cover cookie sheets with parchment.

 

Work with half of the pastry dough at a time refrigerating the other half. It is important to work with dough that is cold. Work quickly or the dough will become sticky.

 

On a floured pastry cloth or Silpat non-stick baking mat, with a floured rolling pin, roll out the dough, turning it over occasionally to keep both sides floured. Roll it to an even 1/8-inch thickness. With plain round 3-inch cookie cutter (I use a glass), cut the dough into rounds. Reserve the scraps of dough, press them together, and rechill until firm enough to roll.

 

Hold one round in your hand. Place rounded teaspoonful of your desired filling in the center. Fold up two sides of the dough-each side being a third of the circle and pinch them together where they meet. Now fold the third side and pinch together at both sides, forming a triangle and leaving a generous opening at the top.

 

Place hamantashen about 2 inches apart on the baking sheet. Bake 12-15 minutes (depending on your oven) until the cookies are barely colored on all sides. Transfer to a rack to cool.

 

Each recipes yields about 30 hamantashen.

My recipe was very similar, but not identical:

1 cup butter (2 sticks)

1 cup sugar

3 eggs

2 teaspoons orange zest

1/4 cup orange juice

1 teaspoon vanilla

4 2/3 cups flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, zest, juice and vanilla extract. Mix well.

Mix flour and baking powder and add to wet ingredients. Divide into 2 or 3 portions and refrigerate for at least 3 hours (you can also freeze it at this point)

Preheat oven to 350 F .

ON A FLOURED COUNTER Roll dough to a bit more than 1/8 inch thick and cut into circles with mason jar lid.  To insure proper sticking together of corners, outline the edge of the dough circle with your finger (keep a cup of water on nearby for this) and pinch into triangle shape.

Place hamentashen on baking sheet with at least 2 inches between them, and bake until lightly golden or corners turn light brown. About 12-15 minutes.

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Yes, MY RECIPE IS ON MY BLOG!

Originally posted on Onecakebaker:

So I taught my Striped Hamentaschen workshop at Etz Chayim yesterday, with the primary goal of passing along my secret, and the secondary goal of getting at least 5 dozen cookies baked for the Etz Purim extravaganza.

stripeprocesspreeva

We got the cookies baked, and the most secret part of the technique, the layering and cutting, was shown, also,

Little did i suspect that, after sharing my recipe on email, in the synagogue newsletter back in 2003, and on at least two of my four blogs (don’t ask) the most common question would be “do you have your recipe written down?”

“Of course,” I said, over and over again. “It’s on my blog.”

IMG_0009 2

Now, my blog does not get a lot of followers, but when I post on my blog, it gets put up on Facebook automatically. So the recipe has been on Facebook too.

striped cookies

But you know, there are people who…

View original 593 more words

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Hai Jew kus for Halloween

Hai Jew Kus, which I am writing for the Jewish Year 5775, are like haikus, but with a second 7 syllable line, so the meter is 5-7-7-5

I wrote a bunch of them on the theme of candy.

One

Sweet, sticky candy

Pulling at my stuck molars

Loosening tight new fillings

Delighting dentist

 

 

Two

Angel hair sugar

Ambitious fork lifted it

Up, Into the air from the

Hot carmel puddle

 

Three

The raging need for

Something sweet late after bedtime

Dark chocolate and ice cream

Quiets the savage beast

Four

Never built a house

Out of candy, didn’t think

Brothers Grimm story was real.

Sent to therapist.

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Epiphanies #1-3 watching bees

IMG_1270So here’s a quick recap of my bee story. So far it has  one hive given to me in 2012 with bees,  at least three epiphanies, submissions to and nice rejections from two editors, two bee suits, 36 jars of honey, a hot tub full of happy young people, 5 books, and a subscription to a bee journal.

Here’s epiphany #1: Bees are like Jews because when they go about their business, everyone gets more prosperous.

Epiphany #2: Cultivation is a form of exploitation,while still being a form of relationship and nurturing,

Epiphany #3:Success is a matter of being like the bee, promoting your interests and others at the same time.

UPDATE: Make that 2 bee suits and a bee jacket, two strainer sets, two solar melters (one got caught in the sprinkler) and 6 books.

 

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In Comb Bees Is

What happens when a self-made Jewish American Princess gets bitten by the beekeeping bug?

I’ll let you know as the story develops. So far it’s led to one hive,  at least three epiphanies, two bee suits, 36 jars of honey, a hot tub full of happy young people, 5 books, and a subscription to a bee journal.

This is how it started:

“We are so sorry for your suffering, but it was not personal,” the executives from Continental Tire, GmBh, the company where he was slave labor in 1944 and 1945 told my father in law, who came to visit them in 2006 .  You were just a number to us, a replacement worker lent to us by the Nazis to make up for the factory workers they took from us for the army.”

A worker bee, in other words. My dad was a worker, too. And my aunts, and my uncles.

I’ve had bees on my mind, since it is now two years since I got my hive full of bees, and a big book called “the beekeeping bible” arrived last week. I can remember their arrival date of the bees very easily since  a stranger delivered them the day after my father in law died.  His name in Polish, TRZMIEL, means ‘bumblebee,’

I had agreed to have a beehive in January of 2012, because suburban beekeepers are keeping hives to counteract the CCD epidemic, and the sad story of the bees moved me. After a year it was time to check on the bee’s health and gather some honey. I borrowed a bee suit  from another stranger–the cause celebre of bee survival is a powerful password–and helped the woman who delivered my hive a year ago take the hive apart, pick out three of 20 or so combs  and put them in a lidded container, and put the hive back together. She complimented me on my remarkable sang-froid. But after she left, I had to deal with getting the honey out of the combs. That’s the hardest part of the process and the messiest, especially without special equipment.

A couple of hours later, I opened up the container to see quite a few bees crawling around inside, covered in honey, trapped in the product of their own labor.

The sight of those struggling bees shook me up. I felt sympathy for them. More–I felt guilty for taking their honey.

So I rescued them, providing clothespins they could use as escape routes from the honey and a container with clean water where they could clean themselves off. Then I felt better, although—having made the mental leap comparing the bees to camp workers—I was not unable to decide if I was I the Joint Distribution Committee, a liberating army, or HIAS (the Hebrew Immigrant Aid Society).

And, do the bees I freed from the mess of honey suffer from survivor’s guilt?

I’ve been studying bees  for the past year, and now, with my new knowledge, I just conducted another honey harvest.  I  harvested twice as much honey, and many fewer bees died. Now I’m eager to get more bees, and more honey,and do it again.

See how easy it is to go from oppressed to oppressor?

 

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